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Worried about Performance Chart – Track Your Employees and Achieve Peaks

by on May 25, 2017
 

IT departments are overloaded with responsibilities, particularly when it comes to performance monitoring. Development team members are often being bombarded with unnecessary email alerts and spending hours looking for the root causes of performance and availability issues.

Companies everywhere are tracking employees’ activities in all kinds of ways in an effort to become more streamlined and productive. Measuring keystrokes or using programs that can tell supervisors when a keyboard has been idle for 15 minutes. Others use keywords to flag which websites employees visit—and block ones that aren’t related to work—or are checking employees’ e-mails and instant messages to make sure they don’t contain inappropriate or proprietary material. Indeed, nearly every aspect of work is now measurable in some way: Hours are tracked via security badges and fingerprint scanners, locations are monitored using GPS, and certain employee activities are captured by digital camera and video.

But while it’s clear that employers can measure nearly everything employees do, the question for many is whether they should. To find out, it’s important for companies to have a clear sense of what they hope to accomplish—and to be forthcoming and transparent in their communication with employees. When employee monitoring is done poorly, businesses may find that what they hoped to gain in productivity is undermined by what they lose in engagement and trust.

Businesses monitor employees to improve productivity and protect corporate resources. The main intention is to prevent unacceptable behavior in the first place and, should that effort fail, to curtail the behavior before it can have a negative effect on the business.

Before deploying an employee monitoring program, you should clarify the terms of acceptable and unacceptable use of corporate resources during work hours and develop a comprehensive acceptable use policy that staff must agree to.

SUMMARY:

One important consideration for employee monitoring is the question of whose equipment they are using and when they’re using it. It’s legal for employers to monitor staff’s use of corporate-owned computers, smartphones and other devices during business hours but if the employee owns the equipment and/or they are on their own time, that’s another matter. The issue of legality becomes murky when employers monitor staff using corporate-owned devices outside of work hours or using their own devices during work hours.

Good workers are going to do their best, but their best may not produce the results you expect to see. How do you know whether the poor results were caused by lack of effort or whether they were due to being put in a position of failure?

The challenge of measuring employee performance is finding a system that minimizes the influence of emotion and personality. Employee reviews often devolve into a situation where the boss scores performance lower for employees he doesn’t like than for employees he does.

The boss letting personal feelings affect performance review is the single biggest complain workers have about reviews. In order to avoid that pitfall you need to devise objective metrics for measuring performance.

AUTHOR BIO:

I am Lochana Varadarajan a blogger and a Project Manager. I believe that the future, although it may not be evident yet, will be intimately tied to the growth of AI; that is why I chose best employee monitoring software that would give me the freedom to discover the depths of this amazing field.

Being into Project management I faced the difficulties in tracking the performance of my team and segregating the productivity of the employee. So, my personal interest in AI and Management lead me to the path of Windows Employee Monitoring wherein I would be able to show more productivity and understand my co workers. The staff monitoring software I am writing about is seriously a boon to the managers in bringing up peaks in the performance chart and making the bond between managers and team a strong one.

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